English in Rosario - Aprendé inglés en Rosario con profesores nativos

English in Rosario es un instituto de inglés que ofrece métodos creativos e innovadores con profesores nativos. Focalizamos en el deseo de comunicarnos con el mundo a través de afinar las cuatro áreas del aprendizaje.

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Blog : Noticias

¡Llamada abierta!

¡Llamada abierta!

Los que nos conocen, saben que somos amantes del arte, especialmente cuando viene de “casa”. Es por eso que este año hemos decidido convocar a artistas locales para que aporten su creatividad a un proyecto cultural bilingüe.

No hay requistos, solo queremos que nos muestren “su Rosario.”

Esto puede ser en cualquier forma plástica: fotografía, pintura, gráfica, etc.

Antes del 12 de noviembre seleccionaremos una obra para la nueva tapa de nuestro libro 2016, promocionando al artista tanto de forma local como de forma internacional. No sabemos que es lo que estamos buscando pero cuando veamos las obras, decidiremos.

¿Qué tienen que hacer?

Mandar las obras por email (no como adjunto, sino directamente en el mail) a englishinrosario@gmail.com con los siguientes datos:

  • Nombre
  • Apellido
  • Email
  • Telefono
  • Medio usado

Aceptaremos obras hasta el 6 de noviembre.

Se puede mandar más de una obra.

Anunciaremos el ganador el 12 de noviembre.

 

Five Frequent Mistakes

Five Frequent Mistakes

O.K. O.K, I know you aren’t all grammar lovers and for one reason or another we have been taught to loathe grammar but I am going to try to make this fun because, as you know, I effing love GRAMMAR!

There a dozens of common mistakes that even native English speakers make and while I am not exactly a grammar Nazi, I do cringe when I hear them. So, let’s get down to business.

Let the count down begin!

5. Insure, ensure or assure?

Let’s make this short and simple. Insure is about the Benjamins. What I mean is, it has to do with money. Dolla dolla bill ya’ll. You insure your car, your house or your life so that, in the case you crash, get robbed or die, someone gets cash retribution.

Ensure is all about guarantee – notice that guarantEE has two ‘E’s. That is how you remember the difference. So if you want to ensure a good grade on the TOEFL, you should study. A lot!

Finally, assure is when you take away doubt. So, picture this: you are super nervous about the exam. You come to me and say, “Teacher, I am panicking! I am so nervous about the test!” and what do I do? I speak inspiring and uplifting words to assure you that you will do marvelously!

4. Affect vs Effect

This one happens often, and I must confess, I always double check my writing to make sure I have used the correct form but the easiest way to remember is:

Effect is a noun. So something or someone had an effect on you.

Her speech had a huge effect on me. 

Affect is a verb. We use it when we are talking about the act of changing.

Staying up all night is really affecting my health. 

So the effects of staying up late are affecting my health.

Get it? Got it? Good!

3. Lose vs Loose

Lose is a verb. It is the oppose of win.

I never lose my temper. (Remember, lose is an irregular verb!)

Loose is an adjective that means the opposite of tight.

If you are trying to lose weight, you should wear loose clothing to help your circulation. 

2. Then vs Than

O.K. kids, this is happening all too often!

Then is in reference to time.  

Let’s eat then we can go for a walk.

Than is used for comparisons.

Her house is bigger than mine. 

1. Lay vs Lie

This one is so frequently committed that even native English speakers and rock gods like Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan can’t seem to remember the difference.

Lay is always used with an object. That means you have to lay SOMETHING down.

Everyone on lay your guns on the ground! 

Lie is the an action that you do all on your own. For example, I lie down every day after work. 

But chaos begins when you have to use the past tense and past participle.

Do you have your thinking caps on?

So the past tense of lie is lay and the past participle is lain.

Wait, WHAT?! Yep, that’s right.

I lie down every day after work but yesterday I lay down at work, I have never lain down at work before.

The past tense and the present perfect tense of lay is laid.

The dog always lays his bone on the doorstep but today he laid it on the couch. He has never laid it on the couch before. 

This last one takes time to remember, but I can assure you that the effects of practicing will pay off!

Birds of a Feather

Birds of a Feather

“What time is it,” Joe asked.

“Now,” Jack responded. Jack had no need for time. He had abandoned his watch along with his calendar and any other methods that attempted to measure the immeasurable. Now is a long time. It is infinite. And because Jack lived there, in the “now”, he no longer needed to keep track of the trivialities of time.

“Oh come off it man, don’t give me that Yoga shit right now! I need to know what time it is. I’m late!”

Joe was a traveler, but not the kind that took a plane from country to country. Instead he hopped back and forth between the past and future, seldomly stopping in the present for longer than a warm cup of tea. And though they had clearly taken different paths in life, Jack and Joe had been friends since they were young boys. There was a closeness that kept them together, a closeness like birds of the same feather.

Jack smiled mischievously. “It’s 8:37 a.m., to be exact, and you are on the planet we refer to as Earth in the city with the given name San Diego. By the way, did you know that your shirt is inside out?”

Come on Jack! I haven’t even had my coffee yet! Please leave your hippie commentary to yourself, oh and thanks for telling me about my shirt! Did you get it?” he asked, turning his shirt right side out in record breaking time.

“What?” Jack responded with a smile as he pulled the velvet box from his shirt pocket.

“You suck dude! How can you be so calm all the time?”

Stepping through the door with his coffee in hand and hollered over his shoulder, “Don’t be late man, this is really important to me.”

“Have a mindful day Joe and may the force be with you.”

“You get weirder by the day man.”

Joe headed for the chapel at a half walk run.

He knew that Jack would tell him to breathe. He heard his voice whisper in the back of his mind, “You do not need to race, she will be there, she will wait. There is no such thing as late.”

With that thought he took a deep breath and made his first conscious step toward the rest of his life.

Super Intensivo

Super Intensivo

Empezando en marzo, un curso intensivo – 9 horas por semana, 3 horas los días lunes, miércoles y viernes.

Living the Language

Living the Language

Comenzando en marzo: un taller de teatro en Inglés!

Este taller está abierto a todas las edades y todos los niveles y brinda una oportunidad increible de, no solo superar nuestros miedos con hablar el idioma inglés, sino tambien practicarlo en un ambito relajado.

Enseñado por actriz y profesora de inglés: Jacqueline Descoins

 

Taller de Inglés para niños

Taller de Inglés para niños

Por fin, después de muchos pedidos del público, lanzamos nuestro primer taller de inglés para niños.

El taller se realizará de 17:00-17:45 los días lunes y estará destinado a niños de 4 y 5 años.

El taller se basará en el aprendizaje espontáneo a través del juego, baile, canto, y arte, enfocando al vocabulario de: colores, animales, números, partes del cuerpo y más.

If I had my life to live over again

If I had my life to live over again

If I had my life to live over again

I would live it just the same

For one does not grow

In the absence of pain

 

And though wounds run deep

They always turn to scars

Leaving their mark on our memory

Leaving their mark in our hearts

 

I am grateful to you

To them and to those

To the events that collided

In making me grow

 

Because learning is done

In the grey space of mistakes

There are no correct answers

Errors unravel our fates

 

No, I would not change

This I know is true

Because each of my failures

Eventually led me to you.

 

Watch, Look and See – How to Know the Difference

Watch, Look and See – How to Know the Difference

Let’s start with look and see.

The fundamental difference between these two verbs is the intention behind them.

Seeing is “unintentional.” Meaning, I may see things even when I do not want to or am not trying to.

Looking is “intentional.” Meaning I am focusing my attention on something.

So, if I am looking AT you, I am focusing my attention on you, but that does not mean I will not see other things that are moving and taking place around me.

To have a clearer idea of this, imagine a camera lens. When you take a photo you capture everything that enters in the frame. Some things may be in focus and others may be out of focus. You can still see everything in the image, but you are looking at (focusing) on one specific thing.

To watch is a bit different. The verb “watch” means you are looking at something as it moves through time; you are staring at something for a prolonged amount of time.

I watch the television, a soccer game, a movie…

You can watch the clock but you can also look at the clock. The difference is, if I look at the clock I do so for an instant, long enough to see the hour. If I watch the clock, I sit staring at the clock as the second and minute hands move.

Then of course there are dozens of phrases like “watch out” meaning be careful or “look for” meaning to search for something.

Look can be used to describe the appearance of things. For example, “It looks like it will be a beautiful day.” “You look really pretty today.”

It takes some getting used to but with time, you will find, these three verbs are easier than you think!

Can you complete the following exercises with the appropriate verb?

I cannot ____________________. It is so foggy today.
Denise lost her keys. She has been_______________ for them for hours.
Did you_____________the movie last night?
_______________ at me when I am speaking to you!
When you are traveling, you must ___________________ out for pickpockets.
I look forward to ________________ you tomorrow.
It ______________ like it might rain, doesn’t it?
Hey, what’s wrong? You ________________ really unhappy.

Dream Job

Dream Job

Read the following short story to see if you can detect the perfect tenses in context.

“So tell us a little bit about yourself Kyle,” a voice boomed from the long lacquer table of black suits and bow ties. All eyes were on him. He had never done this kind of interview before. He felt intimidated being the center of attention.

“Well, I’m originally from Chicago. I have been living here in New York for the last two years, but I have lived all over really. I spent some time in Europe and South America, and have lived in California off and on again for the past 20 years. But like I said. I was born in Chicago.”

He was nervous. Being called for an interview by the New Yorker Magazine was something he had only fantasized about. Yet, here he was sitting before the board; the board who has published the first works of nearly all best selling authors in modern literature. The magazine who, since 1925, has evolved in establishing itself as the number one forum for serious fiction literature and journalism.

“And what brings you to New York?” asked the short brunette with cat eyed glasses.

“Oh um, my grandmother died a few months ago. She left me an apartment here so I thought I would try my luck. She always used to say, “you haven’t lived if you haven’t lived in New York.” So here I am, living.

“And have you always wanted to be a writer?” inquired the slightly balding Jack Nicholson look alike.

“I have never wanted anything more. I have kept a journal since the time I learned how to write. I still carry it everywhere with me. In fact, it is hard to believe I am even here right now. I have dreamed about this moment for so long. To be honest, I actually pinched myself to make sure this moment was real.”

There was a murmur of sophisticated giggles.

“Well, we were quite impressed with your writing,” said Jack’s twin. “Which is why we have decided to offer you a full time position here at the magazine. Your schedule would be from 9-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and when we have a heave deadline, we may ask you to work overtime. The salary starts at $45,000 a year. How does that sound to you?

Surprise painted his face. He hadn’t expected this. He had drawn this day in his mind and acted it out in his sleep, but he had never imagined he would be living it as a reality.

“It has been said, that good things come to those who wait and while that may ring true, as I have been waiting most of my life for this moment, I think that time must be accompanied by hard work. I have worked hard to get here and will continue doing so. It has not always been easy but I would have to be a fool to say no to the opportunity of a lifetime.

“We are happy you have accepted, they sounded in unison. “Welcome aboard.”

Written by Stephanie Cariker

Director at English in Rosario

Daydreaming

Daydreaming

Are you a daydreamer who looks up at the sky? Do you watch the clouds pass by and look at their shapes, imagining them as something else? When I was younger I used to stare at the sky on cloudy days, watching big, fluffy clouds that in my mind became animals, people, or rocket ships. I always had more fun doing this with other people because we never saw the same thing and we could look for twice as many discoveries. Our imaginations helped us to see different things and create other possibilities. Although I loved pointing out new shapes to people, what I enjoyed more was seeing the shapes they found, floating across the sky. I was amazed that two people looking at the same cloud could see two completely different things. That’s the beauty of seeing things from new perspectives. I still look forward to cloudy days when I can watch new shapes emerge right before my eyes. Now I watch the weather forecast hoping for cloudy days because to me, the sky looks more beautiful when it’s painted with clouds.

By Karen Forsythe